Are You Compliant With MEES?

back garden of open plan property with bifolds open

Whether you’re a landlord or perhaps a managing agent, it’s likely that you’ll be aware of the rules around the new Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) which are set to come into force on 1st April 2020.

roof with solar panels

When this new legislation becomes law, it will affect all landlords with privately rented properties, including those which are listed or currently let. To fully understand the rules, we must look back to the 1st April 2018, when the first Energy Efficiency (Private Rented Property for England and Wales) Regulations 2015 became law. From this date, it was unlawful to let or renew the contract of any domestic property that had an Energy Performance Certificate (an EPC) that had a low rating of F or G. As we all know, most properties require an EPC and renters are now clued up on what the colour-coded scale means for them. Excluding F and G properties from the rental market — that is, those lowest on the scale — meant that more properties were brought up to satisfactory standards for energy usage and carbon dioxide emissions.

digital heating control

The new legislation that becomes law in April 2020 now extends to all privately rented properties, including listed properties, for all existing tenancies, regardless of new or renewed contracts. If an applicable property is let long-term, it will need to have an EPC with a minimum E rating and if it does not, must be improved to meet the minimum criteria of an E, unless it is deemed eligible for the exemption register. More information can be found on the government website.

For many landlords this may have consequences – many are already aware of properties that potentially or currently fall below an E rating and therefore the required legal criteria of MEES. The good news is that there is still time to make amends before the legislation comes into force and Fourwalls can help.

Initially, we can complete a draft EPC which will provide an indication of the energy rating and contain recommendations for changes that could improve this. These recommended measures will be included in any existing EPC and vary depending on the property, but may include:

  • Better insulating the roof and/or walls
  • Adding photovoltaics or other energy-efficient heating systems
  • Changing windows to high-performance glazing
  • Adding underfloor heating
  • Using a Smart meter or zoned temperature controls
  • Improving air tightness to reduce draughts

If changes need to be made in order to improve a property’s energy efficiency, our in-house team of qualified Domestic Energy Assessors can advise on the recommendations in the EPC and revisit the property before lodging a final, legal EPC in advance of the impending April 2020 deadline.

Contact us now for a quick and affordable solution.

You Might Also Like

Industrial style kitchen with fire place and ceiling light

5 Cheap and Easy Ways to Save Energy in the Home

If you’re looking to save money and do your bit for the environment at the same time, consider making some quick and cost-efficient changes in your home. In this blog we show you five easy ways to save energy (and money!) with some low-cost kit that you can easily find at your local hardware store or online – search around and they can be found for under £20.

READ MORE >
Semi detached home front at sunset

5 Ways To Improve Your Home On A Budget

If your house is on the market, you’ll want to ensure it’s looking spick and span for professional photography and viewings with prospective buyers. It’s possible to add several thousands of pounds to the asking price of your home by making a few small tweaks – so why not give it ago?

READ MORE >
young people sitting in a lounge chatting

New HMO Licensing Rules: is Your Multiple Occupancy Property Compliant?

House shares are an important and growing sector of the property industry, providing long and short term accommodation to professionals, friends or families. Most house shares are known as ‘house in multiple occupation’, or HMO — but what does this mean, exactly? Generally, an HMO is a property rented by at least three people who are not related from one household, who share communal facilities like a bathroom and kitchen. Many landlords rent their properties as HMOs without even realising it, but since a new reform came into effect on 1st October 2018 most HMOs in England and Wales now require a license, not just large properties. Previously, only properties of three floors or more were covered by the HMO license — the new rules mean that properties of any height where there are five or more sharers in two or more households require a license.

READ MORE >
Search
Close this search box.
Search
Close this search box.

Hive

Please Note: Our previous system is accessible here until mid-2024, please download any past products as soon as possible.